By

In Nevada, there are very few restrictions on what name can be given to a corporation.  First, a corporation may not be the name or initials of a natural person unless it also contains and additional designation such as “Incorporated,” “Limited,” “Inc.,” “Ltd.,” “Company,” “Co.,” “Corporation,” “Corp.,” or other word which identifies it as not being a natural person.  NRS 78.035.  Second, the name “must be distinguishable . . . from the names of all other” companies registered with the Nevada Secretary of State.  NRS 78.039. Finally, the name may not insinuate that the corporation is a “bank” or “trust,” associated with a regulated industry unless it has approval to do so by the appropriate state agency which regulates that industry.  NRS 78.045.

A more practical concern is whether a chosen name infringes on the trademark of another business.  A prudent business owner will determine that the proposed business name does not infringe on that of another.  There are both state and federal trademarks to consider.

About the Author

Jay Young is a Las Vegas, Nevada attorney. His practice focuses on business law, business litigation, and acting as an Arbitrator and Mediator.

Mr. Young can be reached at 702.667.4868 or at jay@h2law.com.