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In Nevada, the elements for a claim of fraud or intentional misrepresentation are:

  1. Defendant makes a false representation or misrepresentation as to a past or existing fact;
  2. With knowledge or belief by defendant that representation is false or that defendant lacks sufficient basis of information to make the representation;
  3. Defendant intended to induce plaintiff to act in reliance on the representation;
  4. Justifiable reliance upon the representation by the plaintiff;
  5. Causation and damages to plaintiff as a result of relying on misrepresentation; and
  6. Must be proved by clear and convincing evidence and be pled with specificity.

NRCP 9; NEVADA JURY INSTRUCTIONS 9.01; Jordan v. State ex rel. Dep’t of Motor Vehicles & Pub. Safety, 121 Nev. 44, 75, 110 P.3d 30, 51 (2005); J.A. Jones Constr. Co. v. Lehrer McGovern Bovis, Inc., 120 Nev. 277, 89 P.3d 1009 (2004); Barmettler v. Reno Air, Inc., 14 Nev. 441, 956 P.2d 1382 (1998); Blanchard v. Blanchard, 108 Nev. 908 (1992);  Bulbman, Inc. v. Nev. Bell, 108 Nev. 105, 111, 825 P.2d 588, 592 (1992); Albert H. Wohlers & Co. v. Bartgis, 114 Nev. 1249, 1260, 969 P.2d 949, 957 (1998);  Sanguinetti v. Strecker, 94 Nev. 200, 206, 577 P.2d 404, 408 (1978); Lubbe v. Barba, 91 Nev. 596, 541 P.2d 115 (1975).

 

See elements for other claims at the Nevada Law Library

About the Author

Jay Young is a Las Vegas, Nevada attorney. His practice focuses on business law, business litigation, and acting as an Arbitrator and Mediator.

Mr. Young can be reached at 702.667.4868 or at jay@h2law.com.