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In Nevada, the elements for a claim of constructive discharge (also known sometimes as tortious discharge) are:

  1. The employee’s resignation was induced by actions and working conditions by the employer which are so intolerable as to amount to firing despite a lack of termination. The actions of the employer violate public policy;
  2. Objectively difficult or unpleasant working conditions to the extent that a reasonable employee would feel compelled to resign;
  3. The employer had actual or constructive knowledge of the intolerable actions and their impact on the employee;
  4. The situation could have been remedied; and
  5. Causation and damages.

Dillard Dept. Stores, Inc. v. Beckwith, 115 Nev. 372, 376, 989 P.2d 882 (1999); Martin v. Sears Roebuck & Co., 111 Nev. 923, 899 P.2d 551 (1995).

 

See elements for other claims at the Nevada Law Library

About the Author

Jay Young is a Las Vegas, Nevada attorney. His practice focuses on business law, business litigation, and acting as an Arbitrator and Mediator.

Mr. Young can be reached at 702.667.4868 or at jay@h2law.com.