Elements for a Claim of Constructive Discharge

In Nevada, the elements for a claim of constructive discharge (also known sometimes as tortious discharge) are:

  1. The employee’s resignation was induced by actions and working conditions by the employer which are so intolerable as to amount to firing despite a lack of termination. The actions of the employer violate public policy;
  2. Objectively difficult or unpleasant working conditions to the extent that a reasonable employee would feel compelled to resign;
  3. The employer had actual or constructive knowledge of the intolerable actions and their impact on the employee;
  4. The situation could have been remedied; and
  5. Causation and damages.

Dillard Dept. Stores, Inc. v. Beckwith, 115 Nev. 372, 376, 989 P.2d 882 (1999); Martin v. Sears Roebuck & Co., 111 Nev. 923, 899 P.2d 551 (1995).

 

See elements for other claims at the Nevada Law Library

Published by

Jay Young, Mediator and Arbitrator

Jay Young is a Las Vegas, Nevada attorney. His practice focuses on acting as an Arbitrator and Mediator. Mr. Young can be reached at 702.667.4868 or at jay@h2law.com. The information provided on this site does not, and is not intended to constitute legal advice. You understand each legal matter should be considered to be unique and subject to varying results. You should not take or refrain from taking action based on any information contained on this website without first consulting legal counsel, as it is not intended to advise you on your particular matter. Further, you understand that no guarantee is given that the information contained herein is an accurate statement of the law at any given point in time, as the law is constantly changing. Guest bloggers are responsible for their own content, which is not to be construed as an article authored by Jay Young. Please see http://nevadalaw.info/disclaimer

Leave a Reply