Archive for: August, 2018

Besides obtaining information from an adverse witness regarding the events which are the subject of the suit, you should also try understand how this witness will attack your claims.  Finally, you should attempt to do what you can to turn the witness into a witness for your case.  There is certain information you can get from each witness that allows you to attack the witness at trial.   Explore lines of questioning designed to elicit the following:

  1. What information must the witness admit?
  2. What information shows bias or impeaches the witness’ credibility?
  3. On what items may the witness’ testimony be limited (didn’t hear or see or experience X, Y, and Z)?
  4. Where is the witness weak?
  5. What does the witness know that agrees with your case?

Nevada Standards of Review on Appeal—A Digest

Abuse of Discretion

In General

“An abuse of discretion is a plain error, discretion exercised to an end not justified by the evidence, a judgment that is clearly against the logic and effect of the facts as are found.”  Rabkin v. Oregon Health Sciences Univ., 350 F.3d 967, 977 (9th Cir. 2003) (citation and internal quotation marks omitted); In re Korean Air Lines Co., Ltd., 642 F.3d 685, 698 n.11 (9th Cir. 2011).

Under the abuse of discretion standard, a reviewing court cannot reverse absent a definite and firm conviction that the district court committed a clear error of judgment in the conclusion it reached upon a weighing of relevant factors.  McCollough v. Johnson, Rodenburg & Lauinger, LLC, 637 F.3d 939, 953 (9th Cir. 2011); Valdivia v. Schwarzenegger, 599 F.3d 984, 988 (9th Cir. 2010) (citing SEC v. Coldicutt, 258 F.3d 939, 941 (9th Cir. 2001)); Harman v. Apfel, 211 F.3d 1172, 1175 (9th Cir. 2000) (noting reversal under abuse of discretion standard is possible only “when the appellate court is convinced firmly that the reviewed decision lies beyond the pale of reasonable justification under the circumstances”). (more…)

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Federal Court Litigation Checklist (Your Legal Guides 2016). This invaluable checklist guides attorneys through all the steps they need to take as a litigator from client intake to verdict. Even attorneys who have practiced for many years find this guide streamlines their practice and allows them to mentor younger attorneys, saving countless hours while teaching their attorneys the valuable lessons that normally take decades to learn.  Buy here.

 

A Litigator’s Guide to Federal Evidentiary Objections (Your Legal Guides 2016).  This guide allows attorneys to instantly find the right objection to make in the heat of battle during trial. Buy here.

 

 

 

A Litigator’s Guide to the Federal Rules of Evidence (Your Legal Guides 2016). A Pocket book for every busy trial attorney practicing in Federal Court. With this pocket book, litigators will be able to instantly translate their knowledge of Federal Rules to courtroom use or look up the rule/statute based on the concept. Buy here.

 

 

Nevada State Court Litigation Checklist (2nd Edition) (Your Legal Guides 2016).  This invaluable checklist guides attorneys through all the steps they need to take as a litigator from client intake to verdict. Even attorneys who have practiced for many years find this guide streamlines their practice and allows them to mentor younger attorneys, saving countless hours while teaching their attorneys the valuable lessons that normally take decades to learn.  Buy here.

 

A Litigator’s Guide to Nevada Evidentiary Objections (2nd Edition) (Your Legal Guides 2016).  This guide allows attorneys to instantly find the right objection to make in the heat of battle during trial. Organized logically, it is cross-referenced to the Federal Rules of Evidence as well as Nevada’s evidence statutes.  Buy here.

 

 

A Litigator’s Guide to Nevada Rules of Evidence (2nd Edition) (Your Legal Guides 2016).  A Pocket book for every busy trial attorney whether practicing in Federal Court or in State Court. Tracks both Nevada and the Federal Rules of evidence in one source! With this pocket book, litigators will be able to instantly translate their knowledge of Federal Rules to Nevada’s statutes, or look up the rule/statute based on the concept.  Buy here.

 

The Self Help Federal Court Litigation Checklist (Your Legal Guides 2016). This invaluable checklist guides lay litigants through all the steps they need to take from initial filing to verdict. Even attorneys who have practiced for many years find this guide streamlines their practice and allows them to mentor younger attorneys, saving countless hours while teaching their attorneys the valuable lessons that normally take decades to learn.  A must for anyone representing themselves in federal court (pro per, pro se, self-represented, etc).  Buy here.

 

The Self Help Guide to Federal Evidentiary Objections (Your Legal Guides 2016).  This guide allows lay litigants to instantly find the right objection to make in the heat of battle during trial.  A must for anyone representing themselves in federal court (pro per, pro se, self-represented, etc).  Buy here.

 

 

The Self Help Guide to the Federal Rules of Evidence (Your Legal Guides 2016). A Pocket book for every every lay litigant in Federal Court. With this pocket book, litigants can find the correct Federal Rules based on the concept.  A must for anyone representing themselves in federal court (pro per, pro se, self-represented, etc).  Buy here.

Can a Party to Litigation Object to a Subpoena Issued to a Non-Party Witness for Documents?

It happens often.  A subpoena is issued to a third party who isn’t part of litigation because that party might have documents that are useful in a lawsuit.  When responding to the subpoena, can a party to the litigation step in and object on behalf of the non-party witness?  The law is clear that a party has standing to challenge a subpoena issued to a non-party only “when it alleges a personal right or privilege with respect to, or has possession of, the materials subpoenaed.” See Platinum Air Charters, LLC v. Aviation Ventures, Inc., No. 205CV-01451-RCJ-LRL, 2007 WL 121674, at *2 (D. Nev. Jan. 10, 2007) (citing Jez v. Dow Chemical Co., Inc., 402 F.Supp.2d 783, 784–85 (S.D.Tex.2005)); First Am. Title Ins. Co. v. Commerce Assocs., LLC, No. 2:15-CV-832-RFB-VCF, 2017 WL 53704, at *1 (D. Nev. Jan. 3, 2017).  In other words, because the party is not the recipient of the subpoena, it has standing to challenge only where its challenge asserts that the information is privileged or protected to itself.  See Diamond State Ins. Co. v. Rebel Oil Co., 157 F.R.D. 691, 695 (D. Nev. 1994) (Jerry T. O’Brien, Inc. v. Securities and Exchange Commission, 704 F.2d 1065, 1068 (9th Cir.1983), rev’d on other grounds, 467 U.S. 735, 104 S.Ct. 2720, 81 L.Ed.2d 615 (1984), citing Donaldson v. United States, 400 U.S. 517, 523, 91 S.Ct. 534, 538, 27 L.Ed.2d 580 (1971)). (more…)